Experimental Strawberry Knit Mini Tova

I’ve been experimenting again–this time for Froo. On Labour Day, we visited Hart’s Fabric, where I purchased a lush jersey knit in Lilac Strawberry from the Briar Rose collection, by Heather Ross. I’ve seen the collection all over the Internet, but it wasn’t until I saw it in person that I fell for the print. It reminds me of a happy childhood summer.

Doesn’t this shirt look like it smells good?
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
I based this shirt on the Flashback Skinny Tee in size 5T (which is the best pattern ever for kids tees: the excellent instructions & photos for sewing with knits, the perfect fit and the versatility for modification make it a staple in my pattern collection). Then I went nutty with my alterations to make it look like my scoop neck tova.

I managed to get a full pleat in the center front of the shirt by adding 4 inches of extra width to the front piece. I drafted the inset piece and tried to get it to look like a continuous scoop, but it’s looking a little disjointed. I’ll just call this one a square neck shirt instead. The strawberry buttons are from Daiso.
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
The neck opening doesn’t require stretch since there are buttonholes in the inset, so I decided to bind the neck opening with bias tape. Besides, I had oodles of aqua dot bias tape leftover from my Datura blouse. Here’s a look at the inside of the shirt:
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
I shortened and widened the sleeves to use the same “Wiksten Tova” method of gathering the sleeves and putting in cuffs. Since the cuffs are narrow, I used a stretch tricot stitch to attach the cuffs and a double-needle to finish it on the outside to ensure that there is still a bit of stretch.
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
To reduce bulk in the sleeve cuffs, the edge is only folded once, making it exposed on the inside. I serged the edges to give it a finished look. This cotton jersey knit fabric is a bit thicker and the edges curl like crazy–it really helps to use a serger to stabilize the edges.
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
The hem is finished with a serger and a double needle:
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
Froo loves strawberries, the buttons and the shirt! But she scratched her foot on her bed a moment before taking photos and didn’t feel like wearing her new shirt. Her unhappy first pose:
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
She is covering up most of the shirt with her bunny, so let’s focus on the next best thing: pinkish taupe suede boots. Recently acquired hand-me-downs from Froo’s second cousins. How awesome are they?
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
I had a couple of head-scratching, perplexed moments while making the strawberry knit mini tova, but I’m so happy with how it turned out! I think it’ll be a great go-to shirt for school as the weather gets cooler. I lengthened the shirt by 2 1/2″, which provides extended coverage and the pleat makes it comfortable for Froo to run around in. I love this look for Froo.
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
Although, I’m not sure Froo is convinced:
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
Finally, a couple of photos of Froo & me in our new knit tovas:
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
Strawberry Knit Shirt for Froo
A couple of happy shirts for a couple of happy girls. Similar, yet different. Just like the two of us.

Scoop Neck Wiksten Tova

If my last knit+voile Wiksten Tova was on the masculine side–being grey, with men’s striped shirting fabric and matching Boo’s shirt, this one is oozing with feminine features: florals, swiss dots, rounded corners and pintucks. I’ve become so familiar with this pattern that I took some dramatic liberties with this version–completely altering the inset.

Presenting the scoop neck knit+voile tova!
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I added pintucks to the front inset based on another shirt that I have with swiss dots. I originally tried to make buttonholes, but my first one went askew and took forever to unpick, so I sewed the buttons through both layers. Although I’m not loving the little white flower buttons, they are inconspicuous and blend in with the white fabric.
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I omitted the gathered front and intended to put a nice box pleat in the centre of the shirt instead. What I ended up with is a microscopic pleat with a gap in the middle! Hardly noticeable. At all. Boogers.
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
To explain why that happened, I need to describe what I did to draft a new inset. After creating a scoop neck curve, I lengthened the end of the inset where the placket is attached, to account for the extra width of the pintucks. After making my pintucks, I realized that I didn’t leave enough room for the placket. I had to narrow down the placket, ending up with a wider-than-original inset.
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
To achieve a rounded corner, I traced a small bowl over the corner of the inset, cut it off and taped it to the front pattern piece. When sewing the inset to the front of the shirt, I used a lot of pins on the corners to avoid any puckering. I love the look of the rounded corners!Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I used store-bought 1/4″ double-fold bias tape to finish the inside of the inset.
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
For the back collar, I shortened one collar piece and attached it the same way as the cuffs, except the ends are tucked in, similar to the application of a bias tape finished hem.
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
While I love the floral printed knit, it has very little stretch and it’s not as soft as my grey tova–I have a feeling that it’s not going to hold up so well in the wash. I’m guessing that the fabric is more poly than cotton, which will start pilling with lint balls. I’ll have to remind the hubs not to put it in the dryer when he does the laundry!

Finally, a couple of photos of me in my latest tova. I had Froo take some outside, but it was rather windy:
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
We tried once more before going back inside. This is what Froo’s photos look like, when they haven’t been rotated and cropped:
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I tried taking some photos inside, to escape the elements. These ones are a classic example of my “I’m trying to look focussed, yet at ease” pose:
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
This next pose is “how I really feel when I take these types of photos”:
Scoop Neck Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I think my latest tova is dramatically different! I don’t have to worry about flashing a bit of bra here and there with this inset–it is staying shut. The scoop could be a little scoopier, but overall, I’m pretty happy with how it turned out! This is my 7th Wiksten Tova (my 3rd one in knit fabric) and I’ve finally had the courage to alter the pattern. I’m still sewing them up, at least one more–a round-up post will surely ensue.

I’m also drafting a mini version for Froo. I was going to use the same fabric, but then we took a trip to Santa Cruz on Labour Day and stopped by Hart’s Fabric for what seemed like 5 minutes, although the hubs was convinced it was an hour. I was drooling over the fabric selection!

When we finally got to the beach, Froo & Boo had a great time playing in the water. They had absolutely no interest in the boardwalk. The hubs tried a funnel cake for the first time. Boo ate most of my soft serve pineapple icecream. There was a crowded bunch of people trying to savour the last bits of summer. Oh hello, September!
Santa Cruz on Labour Day
Santa Cruz on Labour Day
Santa Cruz on Labour Day

Grey Wiksten Tova & Flashback Skinny Tee

After my last post about an experimental Wiksten Tova, I was excited to test the success of a second knit+voile tova. I chose to start with the grey because the fabric is a dream–butter soft and thin, without being sheer. The fibre content is a mystery, but I think it’s cotton blended with either lycra or polyester, with just enough stretch to give it drape without a boingy yo-yo effect.
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
Just as I was starting, I came across this helpful post by Grainline Studio when sewing with knits. One thing that I find really important when sewing with knits is to take the time to really smooth out the bumps and bubbles, without stretching the fabric when preparing it for cutting. A small bubble could distort the entire shape of a pattern piece.

Et voilà, my grey Wiksten tova!
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten TovaGrey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
One improvement that I made with this version is my recent discovery of the stretch tricot stitch on my sewing machine. It works like a zigzag, but oh so much prettier. (When sewing knit fabric, a regular straight stitch has no give and the thread would break when the seams are stretched. That’s why a zigzag stitch or a serger is used for knit fabric.) A double-needle is a great solution, but I am finding that it doesn’t work well with all types of knits, especially the thin stuff.
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
A detailed look at the stretch tricot stitch on the hem:
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
The fabric for the inset is not actually voile–it’s a lightweight cotton shirting fabric. I couldn’t decide if I wanted the stripes running vertically or horizontally–as a happy compromise, I choose to position the stripes diagonally. I like how it turned out.
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I accidentally sewed the inset inside out when attaching it to the front of the shirt. You can tell because the placket detail is on the inside. Luckily, the stripes are identical both inside and out, so it doesn’t really matter. But I spent a lot of time trying to match up the stripes on the placket, only to have them hidden!
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I sized this tova down and changed the sleeves to omit the sleeve cuffs. I originally wanted it to have fitted 3/4 length sleeves, so I took in the width of the sleeves, using the Made-by-Rae Flashback Skinny Tee pattern as a guide. Unfortunately, my arms are not as skinny as I would like them to be and the sleeves were too tight! I had to cut new sleeves, but ran out of fabric, so I settled for short sleeves. I would have liked them a bit shorter, but this length is great for covering up my not-so-skinny arms.
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova
I am looking forward to making more knit tovas! It is so easy to wear. The soft knit is incredibly comfortable and the fit of the shirt is loose, yet flattering at the same time. I am planning my next with a matching one for Froo.

With 2 yards of the grey knit, I was able to eke out a flashback skinny tee for Boo–luckily before I had my sleeve issue. I made his shirt in size 3T, but I lengthened the arms and shirt because the flashback tee I made him a couple of months ago is getting small. I liked the look of the diagonal stripes, so I stitched together 2 pieces on a 45 degree angle to create a chevron print for a tiny pocket.
Grey Flashback Skinny Tee
I had a mishap with the neckband and serger, which couldn’t be undone. I ended up having to cut off the neckband, making the neck opening really wide and terribly unsymmetrical. Boo’s skinny tee became a boatneck tee. After his first fitting, he looked like a ballet dancer. I ended up pulling up the neckline and stitching it down with a button at the shoulders. The fish button was a last minute addition to play on the nautical theme.Grey Flashback Skinny Tee
Boo loves the fish button! He wanted to wear his fish shirt to preschool this morning, but I didn’t want it to get dirty until after we took photos.Grey Flashback Skinny Tee
My Boo will not stay still for photos. Even when I try to bribe him with gummy bears, he starts jumping up and down, causing all sorts of blurry motion.Grey Flashback Skinny TeeGrey Flashback Skinny TeeGrey Flashback Skinny Tee
Grey Flashback Skinny TeeGrey Flashback Skinny Tee
This is the first matching project I made for Boo & me. The softness of Boo’s shirt makes me want to hug him all day long. Cuddles in bed while watching Little Einsteins. If only he would stay still… Maybe I should enroll Boo in ballet.

Froo is becoming my reliable fashion photographer:
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova and Flashback Skinny Tee
Grey Knit+Voile Wiksten Tova and Flashback Skinny Tee
Today was Boo’s last day of the summer session of preschool. There was a cute little party for parents just before the regular pick-up time. Boo’s teacher told me that he is very happy, sociable and will play with everyone. I am so proud of my little man.

An Experimental Wiksten Tova

Everything about this sewing project was an experiment. A potential game-changer in my wardrobe. If successful, my discovery would lead to the perfect harmony of style and comfort.

I’ll start at the beginning: while exploring the Hiller Aviation Museum last Sunday, I spotted a mom wearing a beautiful navy (jersey?) knit shirt with a woven (voile?) yoke in a navy floral print. At the same moment, I realized that the style was very similar to the Wiksten Tova. My excitement could not be contained at the possibility of a knit+voile tova!

The closest thing I could find from searching a couple of my favourite shops is the Castello V-Neck from Anthropologie. I think I need to learn how to embroider…

I used whatever fabric I already had, being experimental and all. For the front inset, collar and sleeve cuffs, I used the cotton voile from the Geranium dress I made for Froo, called “Treasure” in Courage. The heather pink cotton/lycra blend knit fabric is from Jo-Ann. Both are not fabrics I would have chosen for myself. On a personal note, I rarely wear pink. I’ve always been told that I was “cute”, so I avoided anything pink, wearing colours like navy and grey instead. Pink and aqua–now we’re into sorbet and pastel dessert territory. Yikes. But I soldiered on, hoping for the best, yet, wondering if it might end up in my pajama pile.

Ta da! My knit+voile Wiksten tova!
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
If you look closely, you’ll see a seam running down the centre of the shirt. Totally unintentional–I cut 2 front pieces instead of one piece on the fold. I didn’t have enough fabric to cut a new piece, so I serged the 2 pieces together. Oops.
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
I’m still not sure if the aqua and pink are working together or competing against each other. This is my fourth tova and by far the best job I’ve done on the front inset. The voile makes such a huge difference! I also machine-basted the collar before top-stitching it together.
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
When sewing the knit fabric, I followed most of the instructions from the pattern. My sewing machine has a built-in walking foot that helped keep the fabric from stretching. The knit does not need to stretch where it meets the voile, so a straight stitch worked well, finished with edges serged together. For the side and sleeve seams, I only used the serger, to give it more ease. Since the tova is a loose-fitting shirt, I hemmed the shirt with a straight stitch as well.
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
I had Froo take some photos, but she kept chopping off my head. Next time, I will have her stand on a stool. Or maybe I should just buy a tripod and remote. But taking photos with Froo is oodles fun–she’s seriously bossy and my photos end up with some interesting perspective and angles.
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
We came back inside and got one in front of the mirror:
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
Then we took a couple more photos together. We part our hair on the same side, but that’s where the resemblance ends. Froo is a carbon copy of the hubs. She thinks my new pink shirt is lovely and asked me how I got her dress into my shirt.
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
The result of my experiment: this version is too bubblegum pink for me, but the knit+voile tova definitely works as a super comfy and stylish shirt. After dropping Froo off at school this morning, Boo and I took a drive to San Francisco for a “Friday Fabric Field trip” at Fabric Outlet. I managed to pick up fabric for 3 more knit+voile tovas. It was hard to narrow down my choices–with the endless possibility of prints, contrasting solids, tone-on-tone combinations, embroidered voile in swiss dots and eyelet–so exciting! As an added bonus, all of the fabric combined was cheaper than the Nani Iro double-gauze I used in my previous tova. (Still my all-time favourite shirt.)
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
The lightweight blue voile is gorgeous–it has the look of indigo-dyed plaid, with subtle textured diagonal stripes. Not something I would have considered, if it hadn’t been for my attempt to find something to match the navy knit.
Knit + Voile Wiksten Tova
For my next knit+voile tova, I think I will size it down–the front inset tends to gape open from the stretch of the knit. I might even be brave enough to try one with a lace back, like the incredibly sexy one by Venus of Suburbia Soup. Although, I like the knit version because it hides all of the squishy bits, instead of exposing them! I think I will send my experimental tova to my sister–it is better suited as a nursing shirt. Serendipity never looked so good.

I am celebrating my one-year blogiversary today. It’s already been one year since I first published this post. My desk does not look like that anymore. I would update my photo, but it’s pretty messy all the time at the moment. My beautiful jewelry box has been vandalized by Boo, in an attempt to open it. But it’s still glued shut and the contents will remain a happy mystery. Thank you for visiting my blog!

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A cruise-worthy skirt

The Froo & Boo family is going on a Caribbean cruise! We will be celebrating a very special birthday, together with the hubs’ family.
Cruise-worthy skirt
I have been holding onto this fabric for way too long, hoping that it would magically turn into an amazing dress. But I’ve learned that the more you wait, the more things change, then eventually, you change your mind altogether. So now that my mind’s been changed, I need to act on it before it changes again.

Even though I was really excited to have a dress covered with anchors, I decided that the fabric would work better as a skirt. I first found this skirt here and knew I had to make one. Then I found Noodlehead’s skirt sew-along with step-by-step photos so I had no excuses! I got the pattern (Simplicity 2226) on sale for $1.99 at Fabricland a couple of years ago. I am really trying to get all of the projects I’ve planned completed at the beginning of this year, before I start new ones.

I love how it turned out! I used the fabric before in my fabric covered button magnets. It’s from Dear Stella Anchors Away–perfect for a cruise!
Cruise-worthy skirt
I also added a sash in the contrasting white/blue anchors print fabric.
Cruise-worthy skirt Cruise-worthy skirt
I made it in size 8 and when I tried it on, I could hardly breathe with the zipper fully closed. That was on February 5. The following day, I started the 30 Day Shred. I set my iPhone alarm every night and since then, I’ve only missed a couple of days. At first, I thought I was going to die. I was also doing yoga once a week, so I was starting to feel pretty good. Here’s the strange thing: after 3 weeks, I haven’t lost any weight. In fact, I think I’ve gained several pounds. Whaaaat?? I feel stronger and I’m eating healthy meals–the only possible explanation is that the squishy stuff surrounding my mid-section is utterly unimpressed with my efforts. So I’ve resorted to wearing Spanx. How embarrassing:
Cruise-worthy skirt
I’m trying to figure out which pairs of shoes are essential to pack. I’m really digging the pink suede oxfords I recently bought at Nordstrom–I try to wear them with everything.
Cruise-worthy skirt
There are a couple other handmade garments that I am packing for the cruise:
Clothing for the cruise
1. A dress (Simplicity 2584, now out-of-print) I made years ago, shortly after Froo was born. I thought sizing up would do the trick, but it was the first garment I had sewn for myself in a really long time and I didn’t prewash my cotton. I was horrified when I couldn’t zip it up from its lowest point. It finally fits! I think it’ll look good at the beach over a bathing suit. This fabric was also used for Froo’s birthday quiet book. After much more experience with buying fabric, I’ve learned that there is a huge variation in quality, even with quilting fabric. This one is covered with a tiny white floral print and the quality is sub-par with stiff cotton.
Cynthia Rowley - Simplicity 2584
2. A Shearwater Kaftan shirt. I feel a little embarrassed that I copied the look on the pattern cover by using the exact same Nani Iro fabric in double-gauze, but I love this shirt. I wore it on the cruise we went on last winter. I also cut the neck opening on the back of the shirt by mistake, so I had to stitch it together with the bias-binding. Oops. I can’t believe how much Froo has grown!
Shearwater Kaftan
I also like this one tucked into my jeans with a fun belt:
Shearwater Kaftan
3. A Wiksten tank. I’m not sure about using quilting fabric for this top–it would work much better with a lightweight fabric, such as cotton voile or double-gauze. Since there are no darts at the bust, the fabric doesn’t drape very well and hangs awkwardly. I was thinking of making it again while slimming down the sides, but it’s super comfortable and hides the squishy bits just fine. The fabric is from the Melrose collection by Red Rooster. This one is really soft and the print quality is excellent.
Wiksten tank
4. Finally, my favourite Wiksten tova, blogged here. This photo was taken last November when we stopped at Harris Ranch for lunch on our way down to Disneyland. Nani Iro double-gauze is becoming my favourite fabric when it comes to sewing for myself.
Wiksten Tova
I’m really excited about spending time with my family and the hubs’ family on our cruise this year. We had so much fun last year, that we just had to book it again this year. Little Boo has probably transformed the most:
Boo on a cruise
He’s still full of trouble, that one. Last night, I had taken off the sewing machine foot to stitch a button and left the foot beside the machine. This morning, Boo ran to me and handed me the foot and said, “Uh oh, broken. Sorry.” He had the guiltiest look on his face. Even though he didn’t break it, I put him in the timeout corner, where Froo was already serving time. I could hear them giggling with each other, but let them hang out there for awhile before walking towards them. They both went really quiet. I sat across from them and the first person to make eye-contact and break the silence was Froo, with, “Sorry mommy.” Then Boo chimes in, “So-zee! Mommy!” There were stern reminders, more apologies, lots of hugs and kisses–but inside, I wanted to laugh at my darling poo-heads. They crack me up.
Froo & Boo in timeout

Wiksten Tova in Nani Iro

It’s been over a week since returning from Vancouver and I don’t think I have recovered yet. I am exhausted–from late night chats with friends, the fatigue of traveling and returning to the routine of life in California. I have always thought that unpacking a suitcase was more onerous then packing one.

So after leaving my sewing machine alone for a couple of weeks, my first project was one for myself, even though I have piles of new fabric intended for Froo & Boo. I have (finally) returned to my pre-pregnancy weight, so I thought I would reward myself with a Wiksten Tova. I blogged about my dress version here, but this one is a shirt version. The fabric is Japanese double-gauze cotton called Melody Sketch by Nani Iro, purchased here. The fabric is really beautiful. The confetti-dot print makes me smile.

Here is a close-up of the front inset. I sewed the top-stitching a little less than the recommended 1/4″. I think the corners turned out pretty well. The stitching on the inside of the collar on the left side is a little wonky.

I love the collar on this shirt–it moves with your body so it never stays in the same position.

A look at the sleeve cuff. I love 3/4 length sleeves–can this shirt get any better?

I finished the sides, shoulders and sleeves with enclosed French seams and zig-zagged edges. Double-gauze fabric is loosely woven and frays a lot, so I wanted to reinforce my seams. Since the seam allowance is 3/8″, I first sewed the sides with wrong sides together at 1/8″, then used a small zig zag stitch to finish the edges. I then ironed the seams with right sides together and stitched the edges with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Finally, I pressed the seams open to one side. It was more time-consuming for sure, but it’s really worth the effort to have the shirt professionally finished.

Okie, so here are some pictures of me wearing the shirt. Yikes. I always feel awkward taking photos of myself, hence, the cheesy smile.

Here’s a full-length photo. There isn’t a lot of space between the facing mirrors, so my head got cut off at the top–which is fine because at this angle, it’s looking huge.

And finally, a photo of my new TOMS that arrived on my doorstep yesterday evening. So even though it’s a struggle to keep my eyelids from closing, I figure a good dose of colour, confetti & polka dots and my new favourite shirt might awaken my urge to create new things.

If there were 8 days in a week


We spent day 6 of kcwc at the Half Moon Bay Art & Pumpkin Festival, followed by a visit to the pumpkin patch and dinner at my favourite Chinese restaurant in Foster City–best egg puffs EVER. We went with Froo & Boo’s 2nd cousin, who was the ring bearer at our wedding, but is now a big boy! We also went with his grandparents (the hubs’ aunt & uncle) who are visiting from Vancouver. It’s great being with family.

Uncle left his iPhone at our place, so we spent day 7 meeting up at the Ferry Building in San Francisco–one of my favourite places in the city. Then we went to watch our ring bearer’s little league baseball game. Froo & Boo had a blast! Afterwards, we went to shop for Korean groceries in Daly City, then had Froo & Boo’s other 2nd cousins over for dinner. Fewf!

I still had some fabric cut out on day 5 that I wanted to get finished, so I spent yesterday (day 8) at the sewing machine. Confused. Cussing. Seam ripping. I should have left my project undone. But I was determined. I’m pretty sure I have excellent reading comprehension and my sewing skills are alright, but trying to read the instructions in the pattern (McCall’s M6156) I was using was futile. I improvised on most of the directions, according to what I thought made sense. I feel like the pattern makers were trying to save on print, so they used the least amount of words and the smallest illustrations as possible. I need some Oliver + S patterns!

So after all that complaining (don’t even get me started on my machine), here it is:

The fabric is the same heavy herringbone cotton that I used for Boo’s art smock. It is also the same fabric that I used to make my Wiksten Tova dress. The contrasting floral print is from a super-old Old Navy button-down shirt I had. I love my tova dress, it’s comfy and easy to wear. I wanted to make Froo a similar dress, but couldn’t fathom drafting a smaller size of the tova–a beautifully crafted pattern. I’ve made 3 so far and it makes me feel like a sewing superstar every time I finish one. I have some Nani Iro saved for my next tova.

I made Froo’s dress in size 6, but it was much too big on her. I changed the sleeves to match the tova.

Here’s Froo practicing her “school photo” pose:

The waistband on Froo’s dress is elasticized and there is also a tie at the back. It’s still wide with both, but it should fit her next year.

Here are some photos sans Froo.

While waiting for the camera timer, we had a photo bomber incident! 12 seconds is a very long time to wait when it comes to little kids…

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